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Churches in Berlin

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21 churches in Berlin

Churches in Berlin
Kaiser Wilhelm Memorial Church
(20)
The church of memory, also called Gedächtniskirche, is one of the most outstanding monuments of Berlin and, personally, the most spectacular and different. Located in the center of the old west side, in the district of Checkpoint Charlie, where there are also hundreds of stores and malls. Built in 1895 by Emperor Wilhelm II in honor of his grandfather Guillemo I. It is neo-Romanesque architecture and one of the few buildings in Berlin that was not rebuilt after the war, traces of bombing left so everyone remembers what happened. So, the only thing left standing of this majestic church is its bell tower, which is also known as the hollow tooth. When you see it from outside you will be completely stunned, because you see the impact of the bombs in this beautiful piece of architecture, but the interior is just stunning, because they have retained some spectacular mosaics and a frieze depicting the history of the Hohenzollern. Subsequently a temple just next door has a stunning beauty, especially because it has a very peculiar style. This new temple was built by the architect Egon Eiermann, highlights being the deep blue windows and the tower, hexagonal, is 53 meters high.
Churches in Berlin
St. Nicholas' Church (Nikolaikirche)
(4)
The church is the oldest building in the city (1230) and later the Gothic choir was added. The two 84 meter towers are the hallmark of this church and were added in 1876. The interior (which I couldn't access as it was closed) has archaeological sites, collections of religious art and a model of the city from the fifteenth century.
Churches in Berlin
St. Mary's Church
(6)
This church is one of the most visited in Berlin as it's very close to the Red Town Hall and TV Tower (Toothpick). It has undergone several reconstructions and changes, most of the current structure is XV-XVI century. This building, which was surrounded by buildings before today, is lonely in the shadow of the "Toothpick" because of the destruction Berlin has suffered. Its interior is a very interesting, European Gothic with baroque touches in the pulpit and the altar. Overall it's a very beautiful church worth visiting and it's usually surrounded by groups of the urban "Gothic" tribe that are so abundant in Berlin.
Churches in Berlin
French Church
Located on the Gendarmenmarkt, French church symmetry has influenced the German church on the other side of the square. It is also the Huguenots museum, French Protestants who came to Germany in the Middle Ages, who were wealthy merchants. The museum is open in the afternoon. The church was built just for the French Protestants in the eighteenth century. But during the Second World War, the dome fell. Re-built in the 80s, it is very pretty. You can climb the tower for a grand staircase of over 250 steps. From the balcony there are good views over the square and the city. Admire the multitude of small bells under the roof. There are 60 bells made with 30 tons of bronze. Now everything is computer controlled! It sounds at noon and three times during the day.
Churches in Berlin
Friedrichswerder Church
This church was built in the early nineteenth century and was the first Gothic style church in Berlin. It's a very nice building and, although everything inside was rebuilt after the Second World War, it retains its essentially romantic feel. Entrance to the church is free. The perspective of the church from the top (after climbing the "romantic" wooden stairs) is very beautiful. In addition, this church is not usually crowded with tourists and you can spend a very quiet time there.
Churches in Berlin
Neue Kirche (Deutscher Dom)
(2)
The German church is on the Gendarmenmarkt, symmetrical to the French church. It was built for the German Protestants while the French went to pray on the other side. The church reopened after major works in 1996. Inside is a museum with an exhibition on contemporary history of Germany. It is interesting to understand how the Germans see their past and their future. Admission is free, and the place is open every day except Monday, from 10am to 6pm. Upstairs serves coffee and rolls. Enjoy the view of a very harmonious square in Berlin.
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Churches in Berlin
Zionskirche (Iglesia de Sion)
This church is located between the districts of Mitte and Prenzlauerberg. It has easy access to the M1 and 12 trams and is surrounded by bars and cafes. The church was built in 1873 and the roof, altar and choir area were rebuilt after the second world war. The interior is nothing special but it is worth going for a drink on a terrace nearby on a sunny afternoon.
Churches in Berlin
Parochialkirche
The first church in the baroque style in Berlin. The city was heavily bombed by the Allies during the Second World War, which explains why there are not many old buildings, like Rome or Paris. This church is just off Klosterstrasse subway. Below, visit the Nikolai neighborhood. The church was designed by JA Parochialkirche Nering. Construction began in the late seventeenth century and lasted 20 years. The Bell Tower, which King Frederick Wilhelm equipped with 37 bells, survived the bombing. The bells rang for the last time in 1944, and the building, having served as municipal archives, is being renovated. Mass is held in a small chapel nearby. Several famous people from the 18th and 19th are buried in the cemetery next to the church.
Churches in Berlin
Saint Mary's Church
St Marienkirche (St Mary's church) is in Berlin, in a place that has no name, formed behind Alexanderplatz and the Bauhaus avenues and leading to Museum Island. No one knows exactly its age but it's mentioned in writing in 1292. The church was Roman Catholic but during the Reformation became Protestant. Along with St. Nicholas Church it's the oldest church in the city and the original building can be seen in certain parts, but most was rebuilt in red brick church. Before the war it was in a densely populated area that now has formal buildings and shops. It's now the headquarters of the evangelical church in Berlin with a statue outside of Martin Luther King.
Churches in Berlin
Churches in Berlin
Churches in Berlin
Churches in Berlin
Churches in Berlin
Churches in Berlin
Churches in Berlin
Churches in Berlin
Churches in Berlin